The Taste of Hong Kong
September 14, 2015

The Taste of Hong Kong
Published on September 14, 2015 by Antonio Domingo
http://www.timeout.com.hk/restaurants-bars/features/70457/hong-kongs-top-10-street-foods.html

http://www.timeout.com.hk/restaurants-bars/features/70457/hong-kongs-top-10-street-foods.html

While Chinese cuisine is well-known over the world, foodies and locals alike claim that there’s nothing quite like dim sum in Hong Kong. One of the top ways to enjoy these tiny morsels is to visit a teahouse, which is more locally known as a yum cha. But, for people who don’t have the time to sit at the table and leisurely sip some chaa, the next best thing is grabbing a skewers of dim sum from one of many street stalls scattered throughout the city. Not sure what to try among the stalls’ wide selections? Well, Atlas has got your back with a list of street food dishes any tourist in the city has to try.

First up is the all-important, siu mai skewer, the staple of almost every street stall in Hong Kong. These are made from steamed fish paste that moulded together and cooked in a giant steamer many of the other delicious dim sum on offer. These skewers are then served with soy sauce and Chinese chilli sauce. These are often seen around Tsim Sha Tsui and Mong Kok.

Coming in a close second is the curry fish ball. As these squishy spheres rose to popularity in the 1950’s, it’s considered as the most traditional street snack Hong Kong has to offer. They’re made from corn starch and fish, which is then deep friend and dipped into or topped with a thick curry sauce. Like its cousin the siu mai skewer, the curry fish ball is found in almost every street stall in Hong Kong.

http://www.followmefoodie.com/2010/07/hong-kong-hui-lau-shan/

http://www.followmefoodie.com/2010/07/hong-kong-hui-lau-shan/

Third is the mango-filled drinks from Hui Lau Shan. Although technically not street food, this drink is definitely a great way to beat the heat during Hong Kong’s hotter months – normally between May to September. And if you’ve got some time to spare, feel free to pull up a stool and try out their healthy dessert that mostly consist of… well, mangoes.

https://www.facebook.com/oddiesfoodies/photos/a.266243510246009.1073741829.265334227003604/467696260100732/?type=1&theater

https://www.facebook.com/oddiesfoodies/photos/a.266243510246009.1073741829.265334227003604/467696260100732/?type=1&theater

In fourth place is the egg puffs or gai dan zai. Although these iconic waffles may look a little funny, they’re certainly a must-try when visiting Hong Kong. The taste however is just like any old waffle, but what gives these Hong Kong-style waffles their iconic shape are the special double-sided griddles. In recent years, stalls have created more flavours and variations of this local staple. Check out Oddies in Wan Chai which mixes this old favourite up with ice-cream and other scrumptious toppings to get a taste of what we’re talking about.

https://ofinksandpapers.wordpress.com/2012/07/29/milk-tea-rific-2-gong-cha

https://ofinksandpapers.wordpress.com/2012/07/29/milk-tea-rific-2-gong-cha

And last but certainly not least is bubble milk tea. With tapioca balls at the bottom of their cups, bubble milk teas are not only a delicious drink, but also a filling snack. Shops also sell a variety of different flavours, so everyone is sure to find something they’ll enjoy. Some of the more popular flavours include taro, matcha green tea and chocolate, which are all sold at the many Gong Cha outlets around the city. What are you waiting for? Join the queue and watch as a machine seals your cup of iced tea.

And of course, if notice that there are other street snacks that others are having, but weren’t mentioned in this list, don’t be afraid to try them. They’re all good! (Just don’t ask what they are as you might be in for a big surprise.)

Antonio Domingo
Antonio Domingo